• By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 21st August, 2009

Brighter Futures

Birmingham, the UK's second city, welcomes two experts from Washington State as part of their conference for Brighter Futures, a city-wide strategy to overhaul children's services using evidence-based prevention programs. David Hawkins from the University of Washington and Steve Aos from the Washington State Institute for Public Policy give their counsel on why early intervention makes sense.

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Friday 04th July, 2008

Giving the power of prevention to the people

Strong partnerships, careful decisions rooted in good science – and several timely injections of serendipity – have combined to fashion the career of David Hawkins, once a dejected young probation officer, into one of the widest-ranging contributions to the emerging science of prevention."I was interested to know if we could do something to stop the problems of school drop out, delinquency and…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Wednesday 02nd July, 2008

Washington state helps England’s second city get real

Wherever in the world you look, whether the objective is less crime, better education or more confident child protection, politicians and policy makers are asking the same plain question, the leading US cost-benefit analyst told a UK children’s services conference today. How do we introduce effective programs without breaking the bank?Steve Aos from the Washington Institute of Public Policy was…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Wednesday 11th August, 2010

Try counting on the fingers of one hand – and a gerbil

The 50,000 people in Birmingham UK who work with children and are part of the city’s Brighter Futures program workforce were shown a five-finger exercise for making the city’s ambitious prevention exercise a success – and given a cautionary hit-list of five things more that as certainly do not work – by a leading University of Washington prevention scientist at their annual conference yest…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Thursday 04th June, 2009

Time for a new message on family violence?

There are variations on the theme, but most conflict resolution researchers recognize a model that links exposure to family violence in childhood with conduct disorders in adolescence, substance abuse in early adulthood, and violence in later relationships. Outlined by Miriam Ehrensaft at the Society for Prevention Research conference in Washington, last week, these and other links in the chain o…

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