• By Michael Little
  • Posted on Monday 27th August, 2007

All the terrors of parenthood – counting the ways

The predictable public, press and political reaction to the murder of Rhys Jones (Will UK politicians get the message on child murder? – As if! 20 August 2007) put me in mind of the poet and novelist Blake Morrison's book As If, which uses the murder of two-year-old James Bulger in Liverpool in 1993 as the key to an exploration of childhood and how English society views children."On my travels I…

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  • By Ernest Underhill
  • Posted on Sunday 26th August, 2007

Taking a chance on the Chicago youth justice system

In the middle of a stormy August in Chicago an American colleague invites me out to the legendary Steppenwolf Theatre to see a new play called August: O’sage County by Pulitzer Prize finalist Tracy Letts. It’s billed as a “three-act, three-and-a-quarter-hour, 13-character family saga with ‘traumatic autobiographical resonances and large aspirations'”. Letts is a member of the Steppenwolf…

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  • By Michael Little
  • Posted on Monday 20th August, 2007

Prevention Podcasts

Tamsin Ford and colleagues have a nice article in a recent edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry, ("Psychiatric disorder among British children looked after by local authorities: comparison with children living in private households," 190, 319-325).It's accompanied by a podcast interview between Dr Ford and Dr Raj Persaud, Consultant Psychiatrist at the Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospitals…

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  • By Michael Little
  • Posted on Saturday 11th August, 2007

Barmy targets; realistic outcomes

A paragraph in the article by McAra and McVie reported in Prevention Action today (Youth Justice: Is doing nothing better than doing something?) reminded me of the lunacy of many government targets.They cite a 2005 article by David Smith, founder of the The Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime. Based on the work of Friedrich Losel, Director of the Cambridge Institute of Criminology, he n…

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  • By Vashti Berry
  • Posted on Tuesday 10th July, 2007

Heading home and a new society is formed

This morning Laura McCloskey, also well known in the field of domestic violence, delivers an invited address on breaking the cycle of family violence. While the presentation is well delivered and the data interesting, she is criticized for taking a gendered approach to the data collection. Such an approach has meant that she (and her colleagues) have not asked women in their sample about their own…

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  • By Vashti Berry
  • Posted on Monday 09th July, 2007

Evidence gives credence to a 'heresy'

The conference is divided into 4 invited lectures and 6 parallel sessions held throughout the two days, where posters, individual and panel presentations are given. In this respect it is no different to most of the large conferences we attend – the usual suspects are present: bad coffee and endless powerpoint presentations. But in many ways it is also very different – I hope to capture this in…

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  • By Vashti Berry
  • Posted on Sunday 08th July, 2007

A witty ditty to kick the conference off

Registration and a glance through the conference program book at the familiar names of researchers whose research has informed my own studies both serve to excite and daunt me: as a relative newcomer to the field there is always a degree of apprehension at exposing one’s own work for scrutiny. But the apprehension is unwarranted; the group are friendly, professional and above all curious about w…

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  • By Vashti Berry
  • Posted on Saturday 07th July, 2007

Blogging the International Family Violence Conference

I am on my way to the annual International Family Violence conference in Portsmouth, New Hampshire in the US. The conference is jointly hosted by the Family Violence Research Laboratory at New Hampshire University and the Crimes against Children Research Center, both leading research groups in the field. Around 200 delegates, mostly from Universities and research centres in the US, convene to shar…

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