• By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Tuesday 25th September, 2012

No longer lost in translation?

Most evidence-based programs have been developed and tested in the United States and other English-speaking countries, leading to skepticism among practitioners elsewhere about "foreign imports." Cultural adaptation is the obvious answer, but can it be done without compromising program effectiveness?Evidence-based parenting and family intervention programs are effective in improving parenting skil…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 19th September, 2012

Disrupting the pathways of disruptive children

What are the best ways to prevent disruptive, at-risk children from becoming tomorrow’s offenders? Even modest childhood interventions can prevent some disruptive kids from growing into adult criminals. These programs work – but how do they work?Keeping kids out of trouble as teens is one route to success, a Canadian study finds. A two-year intervention with seven- to nine-year-old boys from r…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 13th September, 2012

Mean toddlers make antisocial teens #2 #2

 A little girl scrapes her knee. Crying follows. A little boy laughs at the girl. A decade later, antisocial behavior follows. An exaggeration? Or could the link be true?It’s not a trivial question. It is estimated that antisocial behaviors cost American society over a trillion dollars each year. Understanding why some people engage in such behavior is critical to preventing such costly…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 10th September, 2012

Do different kinds of disruptive kids start from the same place? #2 #2

Conduct disorder, ADHD, and oppositional defiant disorder are considered separate diagnoses of chronic behavioral problems. But despite their differences, these conditions develop from similar risk factors in children’s environments, a recent review argues. Childhood disruptive disorders pose a significant emotional and financial burden to children and their families as well as services and soci…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 06th September, 2012

How the culture of the classroom matters

Cooperative learning has been repeatedly shown to be an effective way to improve academic achievement – in the US, at least. When cooperative learning strategies for mathematics were tested in a randomized controlled trial in the UK, the results were, as the researchers put it, “unexpected and disappointing.” Why might this be the case? There is debate among scholars as to why a program show…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 03rd September, 2012

An expensive solution to a more expensive problem?

Can a $60,000-per-child parenting program be cost-effective? Yes, if it’s well targeted, argue the developers of Fast Track. Although the program is 10 years long, intensive, complex, and certainly not cheap, it helps some very high-risk children avoid developing long-lasting conduct disorders that come with high social and economic costs.The Washington State Institute for Public Policy costs Fa…

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