• By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Friday 30th January, 2009

The proof of the pudding is in the er... pudding

A good cookbook not only lists ingredients and quantities but also goes into the detail of when to add them and describes minutely how they should be combined. Why? Simply because it makes a difference to the outcome; in the case of good eating, to the taste and texture of the meal. Much the same goes for evidence-based programs: the detail of the implementation matters. The reasons why programs…

Read more
  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Thursday 29th January, 2009

A lesson here in conflict resolution?

Theres increasingly compelling evidence that peer collaboration and pairing in the classroom help all students to do well, but so far rather less to suggest what might be a better or worse way to engineer adolescent teamwork.Research by the University of West Virginian duo Lisa Swenson and JoNell Strough published last month in Psychology in the Schools suggests that the friendship between teenage…

Read more
  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Wednesday 28th January, 2009

How the cost of struggling with math adds up

A link-up between a UK education charity and one of its patrons, the European accountancy conglomerate KPMG, has managed to put a price on the social cost of failing to guarantee children an effective mathematics education. The…

Read more
  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Tuesday 27th January, 2009

Outlook is bleakest for the most troubled children

Studies of the progress of UK children born in a single week fifty years ago suggest that aggression and impulsiveness in infancy are very bad for long-term health. The new work by researchers at the University of London indicates that the earlier conduct problems become apparent the more likely they are to have devastating effects. Very naughty children are likely to be anti-social adults and to…

Read more
  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Tuesday 27th January, 2009

Is zero tolerance back in from the urban cold?

A study commissioned by the largest UK teachers union examines whether a poor physical environment outside the school gates harms what goes on inside. The findings are inconclusive but there may be enough in the mix to revive interest more widely in broken windows theory. Carried out by Leicester research firm, the Perpetuity Group, One more broken window: The impact of the physical environment o…

Read more
  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Saturday 24th January, 2009

UK treasury sold prevention with a money-back guarantee

The ideas and achievements of James Heckman, David Olds and Steve Aos, the increasing relevance during hard times of cost benefit analysis, and the principles of much else from the arena of prevention science have all figured in an important debate in the UK House of Commons.They have a place in a campaign led by Labour parliamentarian Graham Allen and the former Leader of the Conservative party,…

Read more

Twitter