• By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 31st May, 2012

The ivory tower’s most profitable exports

As child abuse and neglect costs developed nations billions every year, scientists claim they are developing interventions that can help to limit and repair the damage to families and children. The need is great. The potential is great. But the value of university research is limited unless interventions can be exported from the lab to the community. In a study of one evidence-based intervention…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 30th May, 2012

Consistent parenting: the “active ingredient” in youth violence prevention

As the roster of evidence-based interventions grows, increasing attention is being paid to why they work. What are the “active ingredients” of an intervention? What elements work well together?In a US violence prevention program for middle school students, the “active ingredients” were positive, consistent parental discipline practices and family cohesion, a new study finds. A family-focus…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Saturday 26th May, 2012

The high cost of aggressive preschoolers

It is widely accepted that aggressive behavior in older children and adolescents has a financial impact. Aggressive young people’s delinquency, substance abuse, and unemployment all come at a cost to individuals, families, and society. But what about preschoolers? Raising an aggressive four-year-old might be tough on parents, but is it actually expensive?A recent Dutch study shows just how co…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 25th May, 2012

PCIT: What next for the popular intervention?

In the third and final part of our series on the work and career of Sheila Eyberg, developer of the evidence-based treatment Parent-Child Interaction Therapy and Distinguished Professor at the University of Florida, we look to the future and ask: what next for PCIT?Two things, according to Eyberg. The first is a commitment to expanding the research base for PCIT. The second is developing effective…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 24th May, 2012

PCIT: The scientific method in action

In graduate school, psychologist Sheila Eyberg’s mentors instilled the notion that a “good therapist” is one who views each client’s treatment plan as a hypothesis to be tested. And if the hypothesis can’t be quickly confirmed, the therapist revises and tests the treatment plan again and again – until it works. Looking back, Eyberg explained, “When translated into the graduate stude…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 23rd May, 2012

PCIT: The birth of an innovation

In a series of stories this week Prevention Action profiles the work of Sheila Eyberg, developer of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and Distinguished Professor at the University of Florida. Today we tell the birth story of the intervention that became PCIT.In the second part of the series, we will examine how Eyberg’s scientist-practitioner training influenced the nature of PCIT and its…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Tuesday 22nd May, 2012

Young, impatient – and quite likely drunk

“There are many excuses for why I drink. I drink because alcohol makes me feel better. I drink because my local bartender needs to pay off his creditors. I drink because everyone from Bogart to Bukowski to the entire cast of the Bible drank.” So muses Randy S. Robbins in Modern Drunkard Magazine.So every habitual drinker may want to tell a different story, which makes this magazine version of…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Monday 21st May, 2012

Resilience? Four million hits and it just bounces back

In a paper called Resiliency, Resilience, Resilient: A Paradigm Shift? Joseph C. Napoli, co-author of Resiliency in the Face of Disaster and Terrorism: 10 Things to Do to Survive, reports that the number of hits for a “resiliency” Google search has almost doubled to over four million in the space of a year. He also does a PubMed literature search and finds that in the decade 1997-2006 there h…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 18th May, 2012

Radically re-thinking the child welfare response to substance-abusing families

In the US, roughly half of all foster care cases involve children from substance-abusing families. The standard child welfare service response is to protect the child from abuse or neglect by placing them in foster care and referring the substance-abusing parent for drug treatment. New research from the state of Kansas, however, suggests that a radical rethink on services for these families could…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Thursday 17th May, 2012

The SMILE that says mentoring too often doesn’t work

Research at the University of Texas casts serious doubt on the value of giving indiscriminate support to school-based mentoring programs in the US, where government investment between 2003 and 2006 amounted to $150 million. Like much else in the world of family support, mentoring programs proliferate with the best of intentions: to help children succeed in school and to live happy, productive live…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 16th May, 2012

A safe landing on the other side of the Atlantic

Multisystemic therapy is a Rolls Royce of evidence-based programs. It features on most lists of “what works,” including the highly regarded Blueprints model programs list. Despite this prestigious position, there has been a question on the lips of service providers in the UK. The results of tests of the program in other countries have not been conclusive: it might work in the US but does it wo…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Tuesday 15th May, 2012

Back to the drawing board

For the past 17 years, Mark Fraser and Maeda Galinsky have been designing and developing both universal and selective programs to address anti-social, aggressive behavior in children. Through several studies, they have shown that Making Choices, a brief social problem-solving skills intervention reduces aggressive behavior, builds social competence and improves the concentration of school children…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 14th May, 2012

A small step toward EPEC success?

Most parents would probably agree that few things are more annoying than being told you need to improve your parenting skills. It is especially annoying when the person telling you is a complete stranger who knows nothing about you or your children. The advice is simply more palatable if the person giving it knows something about the circumstances under which you have to parent. At least that i…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 11th May, 2012

The man who is making a difference

In the 1970s there were a number of key catalysts that launched Richard Catalano into a career in prevention science. At that time he was working in regional development and was hired by Joe Weis - leading criminologist - to help review for the National Institute of Mental Health what was known about the causes and correlates of drug abuse and delinquency. Catalano reflects that “the findings of…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 10th May, 2012

Generic interventions “just as effective” as the brand

In the children’s services world, several branded interventions dominate the conversation on “what works,” but increasingly researchers are asking whether we need the brand to get the results we want – or whether generic components can be distilled and embedded in everyday practice.US-based researchers explored these issues in relation to one well-known, widely implemented evidence-based i…

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